Thursday, 4 February 2016

1949 Postcard Of Brighton, East Sussex, England

Brightonin 1949

A postcard from 1949 showing The West and Palace Piers and the Sea Front at Brighton, East Sussex, England.

More East Sussex postcards here.

More 1940s postcards here.

Saturday, 16 January 2016

Postcard Of Factory Farmed Pigs

Pigs! I received this postcard from Finland in the 1980s. The only description on the card is: "Factory Farmed Pigs". But, that's no doubt a message in itself to some.

Sunday, 10 January 2016

Russia Early 1900s Postcard

Moscow, Russia late 1900s

Today's postcard is of Moscow, Russia in the early 1900s. I have no further information about the picture.

Thursday, 7 January 2016

Three Postcards From 1980s Iraq

Postcard from Iraq

Three 1980s postcards from Iraq: Greetings from Iraq. I received these when I published worldwide magazines. Not sure how many people would travel to Iraq nowadays as tourists. Unfortunately I don't know the names of the places pictured.

Greetings postcards from Iraq

Tourist postcard from Iraq

Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Postcards Of Classic 1930s Cars

1938 Morris 8 D Model

A couple of classic cars from the 1930s on postcards. Above is the 1938 Morris 8 D Model.  This body style was first seen in 1935 and replaced by the E Model in 1938-39.

Below is a 1939 Ford 7Y 8HP. This model, produced 1938-1939, was the first of the body-style which, as the Ford Popular was still produced until 1959.

1939 Ford 7Y 8HP

Sunday, 3 January 2016

Weymouth, Dorset Postcard

Postcard of Weymouth, Dorset, England

1980's postcard of Weymouth, Dorset, England. Weymouth is situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel coast.

See other Dorset postcards here.

Friday, 1 January 2016

Postcard Of Tregony, Cornwall From A Painting

Postcard of Tregony, Cornwall, England

A postcard of Tregony in Cornwall, England from an original water-colour by David Skipp.

The back of the postcard reads:
"Tregony was once a busy port, with the right to send two M.P's to Westminster. But the tin mines and china clay pits were the cause of their own destruction as silt clogged the River Fal. Despite Acts of Parliament aimed at stopping mining, the waters receded leaving the highest navigable point over four miles away."

See other Cornwall postcards here.